Tag: communication’

How do you treat the hired help?

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There’s much focus on giving our customers the best possible experience and getting fabulous at customer service, and rightly so – it’s increasingly important in this day of gaining any slight competitive edge to stand out from the crowd for all the right reasons.  We need to build fantastic relationships with customers and potential customers so they stay with us, become loyal and buy again (and again).  If you don’t think you are good enough at this aspect, follow this link for more information on our ‘getting sticky customers’ workshop.

So let’s assume that we are feeling OK about our customer service, we are pretty good at treating most of our good customers well, retention rates are not too bad, so fairly happy days (always room for improvement, but that’s another story).

waiterSo what about the people we hire in to help?

Yes, we’re paying our hard-earned money for them to do a job for us, and being as they are the experts, they can get on with the job they have been paid to do with little input from us (hopefully if we have briefed them sufficiently and done our homework on getting the right person for the job).  So now the boot is on the other foot and we are the customer – and our attitude has changed.  We may now think that we have no customer service to worry about and can act quite differently?

Here’s the thing – your hired help may well be a potential customer, and certainly s/he will have friends, family and colleagues that are potential customers.  Shoddy treatment of hired help says a lot about you and your company, and that experience will be reported to the wider world.  Just because you are paying their bill, you still wish to greet them warmly, give them a cuppa, make necessary introductions, ensure they have everything they need from you to do the job efficiently, so they leave with a positive impression of your organisation and staff.

If your hired help leaves with the best impression, they might just become another member of your sales team and be recommending your great outfit to the perfect client – we love a bit of word of mouth marketing, and you just never know where it might come from!  Treat everyone with the same level of quality service and you increase your chances of it being ANYONE who has dealings with you and your company!

Do ask them too – ask them how it was dealing with your company, did they get everything they needed from you to do their job properly (so you learn and next time you are even more efficient and organised when you need to hire in similar help again).  If you’ve been delighted with their service, offer to tell your contacts about them.  It’s also OK to ask them to spread the good word about what you do – give them leaflets, cards, special offers to give to their contacts if you leave on good terms (and have offered to reciprocate) you know there will be some great endorsement on offer for both sides.

Lady of the house: “Sheldon, I want you to stand at the front door and call the guests’ names as they arrive.”

Sheldon: “Very well, madam. I’ve been wanting to do that for years.”

(with thanks to the Butlers Guild)

 

 

 

 

Olympic success!

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The Olympic Stadium

I was lucky enough to spend the morning helping a client deliver a business breakfast to invited senior property professionals.  The speaker was Ian Crockford of the Olympic Delivery Authority and what a fascinating story he had to tell.  Lots of amazing insights into the build and beyond – which if you’re interested, will be covered in full by the client very soon.  The aspect that I wanted to focus in on was the people element (which incidentally, Ian said could fill a whole lecture in its own right).

There were 16,000 people involved at any one time on the Olympic build, and a total of 45,000 over the period of the project.  The management constantly and clearly communicated with their team – everyone was always aware of key objectives, timescales and delivery plans.  Health and safely were paramount, there were no fatalities or serious injuries on the build at all – beating industry standards.  The had people in to talk to staff who had lost loved ones on projects and the impact it had had on their family, just to make sure that the message on health and safely really got through.  Everyone took responsibility and helped each other.

They managed to create a real sense of community, turnover of staff was extremely low, there was no sabotage, racism and even swearing was at a minimum (can this be true!).

Having a clear vision, constantly and clearly communicating that vision to  staff meant that the Olympic park build was a huge success – the secret of gold medal management obviously!

When WOW won’t work!

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It’s not meant as a tongue twister, but I just wanted to make the obvious point that you can’t jump to the fun and creative stuff of creating WOW moments for your customers if you don’t have the fundamentals right in the first place!

What do your customers think of you?

Check your systems, are they smooth and efficient – are there glitches that you know you need to sort out? If there are, be honest, own up, apologise, explain what you are doing to fix things and then keep on informing about progress.

Which leads to – communication?  Are you talking to people on a regular basis – are you sorting out their issues in a timely and efficient manner?  Are you letting them know when you are not around, and informing them when you will be so they know when to expect your response, or a good time to get results?

Promises – do you do what you say you will do?  That’s the minimum you need to do of course, if you make that promise you have to deliver at least what you said you would.

What about your staff – have you clearly communicated to them how you wish your customers to be treated – the exact same way on Monday morning to Friday afternoon!

Things go wrong, and certainly technology lets us down on a regular basis- everybody knows we can’t be perfect all the time – but it’s how we handle the imperfections that will really make us stand out from the crowd.  Ignore the problems at your peril – for all the WOW moments you create will be drowned out by the noise of the disgruntled few.

What do your customers really think of your organisation and doing business with you – why not ask them?  Create a great survey and say you want to understand and improve their experience, offer a prize or incentive for their time – and then comes the crucial part – implement and improve where necessary.  When you have done all that – you can tell people what you did and why – happy WOWing!