Tag: top tips for customer service’

People, personalities and chocolate!

 - by dawn

I run chocolate workshops for adults, children and teams through my business, The Melting Pot.

The dynamics of a group on a workshop are always fascinating to me. I gather a group together and teach them how to make chocolates, but it’s always so much more complicated than just doing your thing!

I have to be quick to work out the personality types within a particular group  and ensure each receives the best possible experience.  Although this comes fairly naturally to me,  it’s my mission to make everyone comfortable, happy and enjoy their workshop as much as possible.

The noisy ones love a bit of banter, and I’m happy to quip away with them, but they might need toning down if they get a little over excited – especially with quiet ones in the room, who can easily get drowned out.

I make a point of going up to quieter ones and speaking to them individually, ensuring I give them just as much attention as others who demand it.  In this way, I’m talking to the quiet ones in the way that makes them feel more comfortable in a group situation.

I often get people who are timid, shy and lacking in confidence – I make it my mission to praise, encourage and support their efforts and to see them blossom and be proud of what they have made is a real boost.  A couple of hours of chocolate therapy, delivered in the right way, does wonders for anyone!

I always ask for feedback, and I analyse every workshop to tweak and hone and continually improve experiences – the buzz I get from giving people a good time is why I just love what I do!  When people leave my premises, with bags full of chocolates and a great big smile on their face, I’ve achieved my mission!  I have 100’s of testimonials to back up my claims here, but I feel if you make other people’s enjoyment your absolute priority, then tailor what you are offering to suit every person, you are bound to get some great praise as well as lots of word of mouth recommendations along the way!  Happy days!

Dawn Fry 

best-customer-service-2Dawn started The Melting Pot from the summerhouse at the end of her garden in Hitchin in 2009. Despite the family name there is no family history of working with chocolate – Dawn just loved chocolate and people and decided to put the two together!

Dawn has developed a ‘WOW workout programme’ working with companies to improve their customer experience offering and to help motivate and empower customer-facing teams! She is currently writing her first book – ‘12 Steps to Getting Sticky Customers’ (that will include many more tales from the chocolate tank)!  She has recently been nominated for a Customer Service Award at the National Entrepreneurs Convention.

The experience theme runs in the family as Dawn is married to blacksmith Jo Fry, who runs ‘Be a Blacksmith for a Day’ courses from his forge at Standalone Farm in Letchworth.

 

 

Want the best possible customer experience – try adding some chocolate!

 - by dawn

My passion for providing the best customer experience started with chocolate……

 The Melting Pot – a vat of delicious molten chocolate and an eclectic mix of people!

The concept for my first business providing chocolate-making workshops,  was born from the desire to find an activity that would involve working with food and people in some capacity from my then called ‘shed’ at the bottom of the garden.  Inspired by other locals providing flower-arranging and sewing classes – I racked my brains to come up with something exciting.  Suddenly it came to me – chocolate – it had to be chocolate workshops too, I am not the sort of person to spend days on my own producing chocolates to sell – I wanted to spend time with people enjoying chocolate together!

The Summerhouse

At the time I was working part-time in people development for a property recruitment company.  The market crashed and I lost my job at the end of June 2009.  What an opportunity – I spent the next two months working furiously with my husband on the refurbishment of ‘the summerhouse’ and launched the new business in September 09.
I had many sleepless nights and lived with a level of fear for the first few months. I kept saying the well-known mantra ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’ and as uncomfortable as it was, I just kept going.

Some of the things I love about running my own business is the way I can stamp my personality on all that I do, everything can reflect my values and my desire to create the right atmosphere.  Being a huge fan of customer service excellence I have to ensure that all my clients enjoy far more than a real chocolate treat.

I find it amazing the therapeutic effect that a workshop has – it’s been a great privilege to share so many stories over the tank and to make people feel valued and special is something that I take a huge amount of pleasure from.  We have lots of fun and laughs too, and I have discovered that it is so good for people to take a couple of hours out of their ‘real lives’ and do something creative and rewarding.  For someone to really care that they have a good time, that they deserve just that and more…..(well they do get to take home all their lovely chocolate creations too of course) is what makes a workshop experience so much more than chocolate.  I really love what I do, I so enjoy meeting all the different people that come to the summerhouse and I can’t express enough the importance of providing the best possible experience that you can for each and every person that is involved with your business.

Find your passion – add a little chocolate perhaps and the rest should be easy…..

Chocolate-making workshops for adults, children and corporate team building www.makechocolates.co.uk

How’s your telephone manner? My top 10 tips for dealing with customers on the phone!

 - by dawn

It’s much harder to build rapport when you are not face to face with a client – and the client phoning doesn’t know or care what sort of workload you are trying to get through, the time pressures you might be under or the fact that you had too many beers last night at the footie and have a bit of headache!  So once you hear the phone ringing, take a deep breath and prepare for the caller……

1. Say ‘hello’ with a smile (you can tell in someone’s voice whether they are smiling or not!)

2. Give your name

3. Be yourself, but a friendly and upbeat version of yourself

4. Ask for their name, write it down and use it in the conversation

5. Don’t pass them around the system – deal with the issue yourself until the caller is satisfied with the outcome

6. Write down the caller’s number and repeat it back to them if you need to phone them back (wrong numbers are bad news)

7. Let angry people let off steam, it’s not about you, it’s about the service or issue they have had difficulties with (obviously never let anyone abuse you personally, that is totally unacceptable)

8. Empathise, listen carefully, make notes, make the right noises in order to build rapport and trust

9. Be interested and professional (never promise anything you know you are unable to deliver, or be derogatory about the organisation you work for)

10. Explain what you can do to help, when you will be able to do it, and follow through

 

When WOW won’t work!

 - by dawn

It’s not meant as a tongue twister, but I just wanted to make the obvious point that you can’t jump to the fun and creative stuff of creating WOW moments for your customers if you don’t have the fundamentals right in the first place!

What do your customers think of you?

Check your systems, are they smooth and efficient – are there glitches that you know you need to sort out? If there are, be honest, own up, apologise, explain what you are doing to fix things and then keep on informing about progress.

Which leads to – communication?  Are you talking to people on a regular basis – are you sorting out their issues in a timely and efficient manner?  Are you letting them know when you are not around, and informing them when you will be so they know when to expect your response, or a good time to get results?

Promises – do you do what you say you will do?  That’s the minimum you need to do of course, if you make that promise you have to deliver at least what you said you would.

What about your staff – have you clearly communicated to them how you wish your customers to be treated – the exact same way on Monday morning to Friday afternoon!

Things go wrong, and certainly technology lets us down on a regular basis- everybody knows we can’t be perfect all the time – but it’s how we handle the imperfections that will really make us stand out from the crowd.  Ignore the problems at your peril – for all the WOW moments you create will be drowned out by the noise of the disgruntled few.

What do your customers really think of your organisation and doing business with you – why not ask them?  Create a great survey and say you want to understand and improve their experience, offer a prize or incentive for their time – and then comes the crucial part – implement and improve where necessary.  When you have done all that – you can tell people what you did and why – happy WOWing!

My top 5 tips for face-to-face meet ‘n greet!

 - by dawn

Is this the face of your business?

 

1.  Smile – always
(I’m sometimes referred to as Mrs Smiles – I could be called far worse things, but I make a great big friendly smile a trademark of mine. If you always greet people with a warm and welcoming smile, it sets the right tone – and take it as a good sign if your cheeks ache at the end of any event!)

2.  Be friendly, helpful and above all professional at all times
(Be in the right ‘uniform’ – that doesn’t mean you need to be bland and uninteresting in your choice of outfit, but give some thought to how you wish others to perceive you, at first glance.  If someone presents as stressed and anxious, don’t be impatient and unforgiving – you don’t know what sort of day they have had so far – you could make the difference for them.)

3. Go the extra mile
(Why not physically take people to where they need to go, run an errand, hand them a drink – whatever would add a little extra to their experience.)

4. Introduce people to each other
(Especially if you see someone standing on their own, or they are ‘first-timers’ to the event you are running for example.  Don’t just give the names of the people you are introducing, offer a fuller introduction of what they each do, and why you think they would find talking to each other useful.)

5. Never underestimate who you are talking to
(Be as friendly to the receptionist as you would to the CEO – we have all heard the stories about CEO’s ringing down to reception to ask their first impression of someone – that could be YOU!)